Projects

National Core Indicators

National Core Indicators (NCI) was developed by HSRI and the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services as a means for public developmental disabilities agencies to measure and track their own performance. States that participate in NCI pool their resources and knowledge to create performance monitoring systems, identify common performance indicators, work out comparable data collection strategies, and share results. Notably, many of the state agencies use NCI as a key component within their quality management systems. This multi-state collaborative effort to improve performance is unprecedented, and participation has grown from 15 states in 1997 to more than 40 today.
 
The core indicators include approximately 100 consumer, family, systemic, cost, and health and safety outcomes—outcomes that are important to understanding the overall health of public developmental disabilities agencies. The data are collected via standardized surveys, including a consumer survey, family surveys, and a provider survey. The consumer survey, which is the heart of NCI, requires an in-person interview, and the survey was recently revised to include enhanced information about health and wellness, employment status, and ability to self-direct among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
 

National Core Indicators (NCI) was developed by HSRI and the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services as a means for public developmental disabilities agencies to measure and track their own performance. States that participate in NCI pool their resources and knowledge to create performance monitoring systems, identify common performance indicators, work out comparable data collection strategies, and share results. Notably, many of the state agencies use NCI as a key component within their quality management systems. This multi-state collaborative effort to improve performance is unprecedented, and participation has grown from 15 states in 1997 to more than 40 today.
The core indicators include approximately 100 consumer, family, systemic, cost, and health and safety outcomes—outcomes that are important to understanding the overall health of public developmental disabilities agencies. The data are collected via standardized surveys, including a consumer survey, family surveys, and a provider survey. The consumer survey, which is the heart of NCI, requires an in-person interview, and the survey was recently revised to include enhanced information about health and wellness, employment status, and ability to self-direct among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.